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www.dreamwarriorrecovery.com Large Scale Recovery website with all the latest news, views and opinions over 5000 separate historical articles. Meditation,Spirituality. The fellowships has helped millions to stop drinking, drugging which is a vital step for everyone on the spiritual path, but its inherent limits as a program prevent its members from becoming fully recovered.

 

Fraser Trevor Fraser Trevor Author
Title: It is fair to say that Bill Wilson didn't write the steps; he numbered them.
Author: Fraser Trevor
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Cover via Amazon The Twelve Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous were structured by Bill W. and company, and they are derived from several mil...
Cover of "The Twelve Steps Of Alcoholics ...
Cover via Amazon
The Twelve Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous were structured by Bill W. and company, and they are derived from several millennia of rich philosophical and spiritual traditions. It is fair to say that Bill Wilson didn't write the steps; he numbered them. But it was the right philosophy espoused in the right way at the right time to have socially transforming results. Looked at objectively, they are a sound guide for living, even for the nonalcoholic.

The Actual Steps

The first three steps are taken by the individual. The alcoholic owns up to the fact that booze has gotten the better of him, that he is powerless in its grip, and that he needs help to extricate himself from his predicament. AA calls it a “power greater than yourself” that can restore you to sanity. The alcoholic then decides to surrender his will to that power.
Do you think you are an alcoholic?
Check out an AA pamphlet called 44 Questions and take the test. Or use this general rule: If you think you have a problem, then you do. The very fact that it weighs on your mind indicates you have a problem.
The fourth and fifth steps involve a “coming out” of sorts. It is recommended that the alcoholic make what is called a “searching and fearless moral inventory” of themselves. They take stock of their lives and try to see where they went wrong and how they can make things right. In the fifth step, they share this highly personal information with another human being, usually their AA sponsor. For many people, this is one of the most difficult things they will ever have to do. The rewarding element is that they find that they are not alone, and that the person they share the information with most likely will have had similar experiences. In the sixth and seventh steps, the alcoholic asks God to remove these “defects of character” identified by the alcoholic and his sponsor or confessor.
Steps eight and nine also do not come naturally to the alcoholic, or anyone for that matter. The alcoholic is advised to make a list of the people he or she has harmed during his or her drinking days. This usually involves family members, employers, employees, and various and sundry loved ones. This can be an embarrassing and painful process, but again self-interest is the primary motivating factor. If confession is good for the soul, making amends is even better. It is a weight off the shoulders and a burden lifted from the guilty conscience.
Steps ten through twelve are what are traditionally called “maintenance steps.” The alcoholic continues monitoring those pesky character defects, prays and meditates for guidance from his High Power, and, very importantly, carries the message through service and helping the newcomer, giving back what has been freely given him or her.

The Issue of Surrender

Many newcomers have a big problem with this business of surrender, the admission of powerlessness, and the concept of the High Power. While most of the early AA members were Christians and that influence is heard in the language, AA is as much akin to Eastern thought as the Judeo-Christian tradition — plus a healthy dose of pragmatic and positive selfishness.
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