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www.dreamwarriorrecovery.com Large Scale Recovery website with all the latest news, views and opinions over 5000 separate historical articles. Meditation,Spirituality. The fellowships has helped millions to stop drinking, drugging which is a vital step for everyone on the spiritual path, but its inherent limits as a program prevent its members from becoming fully recovered.

 

Fraser Trevor Fraser Trevor Author
Title: AA as a whole – not to mention other 12- Step fellowships – seems to have forgotten that an hour's “quiet time” each morning was regarded as mandatory for the early AAs in Akron.
Author: Fraser Trevor
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Saint Padre Pio stated: "Through the study of books one seeks God; by meditation one finds him". The Rosary: A Path Into Prayer...
Saint Padre Pio stated: "Through the stud...
Saint Padre Pio stated: "Through the study of books one seeks God; by meditation one finds him". The Rosary: A Path Into Prayer by Liz Kelly 2004 ISBN 082942024X pages 79 and 86 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)
Step 11 suggests that we seek through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious
contact with God as we understand God, praying only for knowledge of God's will for us and the
power to carry that out.

By the time we reach Step 11, most of us are familiar with the concept of, and routinely
practice, prayer.  Not all of us meditate, though, and AA as a whole – not to mention other 12-
Step fellowships – seems to have forgotten that an hour's “quiet time” each morning was
regarded as mandatory for the early AAs in Akron.  This practice came from the Oxford Group,
from which AA came and which was uncompromisingly Christian.    During this period of an
hour, the recovering alcoholic would ask for guidance.  If he received any specific guidance, it
was recommended that he check this with someone else before acting upon it.  
There may be various reasons why the recommendation of an hour's quiet time did not
appear in the AA Big Book.  One possibility is that the Oxford Group, and its founder Frank
Buchman in particular, had fallen into some disfavor by the time the Big Book was published, to
the extent that one looks in vain in its first 164 pages for any mention of Buchman or the Oxford
Group.   But another may be that the Big Book does not seem much interested in prayer and
meditation for their own sake, but rather emphasizes the results of their practice.   This is an
important observation, and we will be looking at it in more detail in other Studies.
By contrast with the Akron AAs, for most people in Program today, “meditation” consists of
reading “meditation books” and then presumably thinking about what they have read.  This is
tantamount to claiming we pray because we read “prayer books” and then think about what they
say.  Prayer and meditation are basic actions.  We don't merely talk about praying, read about
praying, think about praying, or believe that praying is a good idea.   We pray.  Similarly, we
don't merely talk about meditation, read about meditation, think about meditation, or believe that
meditation is a good idea.  We meditate.  As we have said already, most people in Program pray.  
However, most people in Program don't meditate.  Furthermore, if meditation is mentioned to
them, the response can vary from discomfort to horror.  Thus a basic practice of the early AAs,
and a fundamental recommendation of the Twelve Steps, is not merely ignored but regarded with
distaste.
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